Career Assessments and Career Tests

Career assessments are an essential component of the re-careering process. When taking career assessments it’s quite important to remember that these are indicators of an individual’s career interests and career aptitudes. These assessments, along with private career coaching and much in-depth analysis, will provide the total picture to help guide an individual’s future career.

Career Tests are Indicators – Not Absolutes

At Career Design we refer to these instruments as career assessments versus career testing because of this important distinction. There is no pass or fail, and there is no test that dictates “you must follow this path.” Rather, Dr. Harkness uses these instruments as a component in the career change process.

Dr. Harkness has been providing career counseling since 1978, and has extensively researched many of these assessments. Today there’s a great variety of career tests available for adults in career change, and the CDA process incorporates the most valuable.

Foundational Career Assessments

Below is a sampling and brief explanation of the career assessments used at Career Design as part of the career change process.

Career Satisfaction/Unrest: Identifies your career satisfaction/unrest on five levels.
Self Directed Search (SDS): Matches your favorite activities and interests to Occupations, Fields of Study and Hobbies.
Holland Interest/
Occupation Matrix:
Identifies your self-concept code.
Eureka Skills Inventory: Compares the skills you want to use in your future to those of 700 occupations.
Strong Interest and Skills Confidence Inventories: Compares your interests and skills confidence to the general population, and to those in specific career fields.
16PF Personal Career Development Profile: Identifies personal characteristics and strengths leading to your career success and matches personality traits to specific careers and areas for self-improvement.
Myers-Briggs Temperament Indicator: Determines your temperament type for communication, decision making, relationships, and matching careers.
Values Assessment: Identifies personal and professional principles.
Needs: Points out your internal needs and possible conflicts.
The Party: Identifies what types of personalities and interests you are drawn to.
Life Style – Personality/Self-Management Tendencies: Determines how you like to live your life, and reveals adjectives that describe you.
Entrepreneurial Characteristics Indicator: Determines how many traits you have in common with other entrepreneurs.
Career Success Criteria/Prescription: Identifies the factors you consider extremely important in your work and life. This is very helpful in getting your goals and priorities established.
Books: A choice of The Career Chase, Don’t Stop the Career Clock, or Capitalizing on Career Chaos.

As mentioned earlier, these career assessments make up one of the many steps an adult would complete in the career change process.

Do you know someone who needs help with a career change? Or are you looking into a career change yourself? You can get started by taking this free career quiz.

If you would like to skip the career quiz and schedule an initial free career coaching session with Dr. Harkness, email us today.